News archives

Researchers sampling Porter Creek

Press Release: New paper shows that adding even small amounts of water to streams can help California’s migratory fish

Researchers from UC Berkeley and California Sea Grant say the technique offers a simple tool to help assist California’s migratory fish

Michael Wells and his dog

From finance to shaping a sustainable future

California Sea Grant State Fellow Michael Wells looked at lithium extraction to help California reach its targets for clean air and climate change

Oyster bags in Tomales Bay. Courtesy of Jonathan MacKay.

The birth of the California Current Acidification Network

When oyster larvae started dying in record numbers, California Sea Grant jumped into action

Volunteers measuring beach

New Website Shares Beach-Monitoring Data

Decades of community science now, for the first time, easily accessible

Min Khant Han prepares to go diving. Courtesy of Min Khant Han.

Ready for the Next Step: Underrepresented & Minority Undergrads Wrap Up Their California Sea Grant Internships

The year-long internships focus on kelp recovery, but the opportunity allows students to gain new experiences in science. For some, it’s helping to launch new careers.

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The story in the data

Marine science interns turn to storytelling to clarify the numbers behind hypoxia in California

A view from the cliffs of the rocky coastline of Greyhound Rock State Marine Conservation Area.

California Sea Grant’s Role in Creating the MPA Network

The state’s unique network of marine protected areas extends for over a thousand miles and protects California’s coastal and marine ecosystems holistically

An ecosystem of the pacific ocean is visible during low tide in Pismo Beach with rocks, tide pools, grass and a person walking their dog on the sandy beach.

Researchers are studying how oyster reefs and eelgrass can fight coastal erosion in California

Living shorelines can help combat erosion caused by sea level rise. A new study investigates what approaches work best.

Meliza Le Alvaredo headshot

California Sea Grant Welcomes Binational Climate Fellow

Through a new fellowship, Meliza Le Alvarado will improve access to coastal resilience science for communities around the San Diego-Northern Baja California region.

Russian River with low water flow.

Droughts are Shifting Migration Patterns in Already Endangered Russian River Coho Salmon

Lower flows and warming water temperatures are creating a potentially deadly timing mismatch for young salmon headed to sea

San Elijo Lagoon at sunset.

Scientists study an unexpected climate change problem: Rising groundwater levels

Already, water tables in some areas are inching up. This could make coastal regions more prone to flooding. But there are more insidious consequences, too.

Coralline algae covered in barnacles. Courtesy of Emily Donham.

Study finds coralline algae are threatened by the dual stressors of ocean acidification and warming

These hard algae look similar to coral and are ecologically and economically important to kelp forest ecosystems

Tumble culture of the red seaweed dulse (Devaleraea mollis) was used to buffer natural pH fluctuations, to feed juvenile abalone, as can be grown for human consumption with our industrial partner, Monterey Bay Seaweeds. Courtesy of Scott Hamilton.

Ocean acidification can pose a challenge to abalone aquaculture. Seaweed can help

Growing dulse alongside abalone could have big benefits for aquaculture

In December of 2019, Pacific sardines were collected for experimentation in net pens of the Everingham Bros. Bait Co. in Mission Bay, San Diego, CA.

California’s sardines aren’t growing as large in warming oceans

Climate change sardines may impact fisheries and food webs.