Theresa Sinicrope Talley

California Sea Grant Extension Specialist
University of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Extension Team / tstalley@ucsd.edu / 858-534-4600

Biography

Talley uses science to advance the field of ecology, address coastal environmental issues, train tomorrow's leaders, and raise public awareness of our local natural ecosystems. Her research in coastal ecosystems spans both coasts of North America, with experience from New England, California, and Baja California, Mexico.

Research

Talley's three broad research programs are:

(1) Healthy Ocean-Healthy City, the goal of which is to improve the health of ecosystems, urban communities and seafood producing livelihoods by raising public awareness of our responsible seafood producers and by facilitating a diversity of local, native seafood in fisheries and farms.

(2) Coastal Ecosystem Ecology and Conservation, the goal of which is to improve our understanding of coastal ecosystems (salt marshes, estuaries, coastal scrub, riparian) so that we can make well informed decisions to protect and utilize their multitude of functions. This includes testing the influences on coastal ecosystem function especially during ecosystem restoration, species invasions and climate change.

(3) Making Waves, the goal of which is to use scientific research to encourage environmental stewardship and community well-being by strengthening connections between our citizens and coastal ecosystems, by better understanding how to get people engaged and active, and by enhancing and restoring our local urban ecosystems.

Education and Outreach

Talley participates in outreach activities for the public, environmental practitioners and educators, and since 2005 has taught a diversity of ecology, biology and environmental science classes at UCSD (current), University of San Francisco and University of San Diego, giving her the ability to effectively teach and communicate across a range of audiences. Since 2005, Talley has also served as a science advisor and wetland scientist for the Ocean Discovery Institute.

Academic Training

Talley received a bachelor’s degree in Botany from Connecticut College, a master’s degree in Biology from San Diego State University and her doctorate in Ecology from University of California, Davis.

Relevant Publications

  • Talley, T.S., H. Warde, N. Venuti. 2016. Local seafood availability in San Diego, California seafood markets. Future of Food: Journal on Food, Agriculture and Society 4(2): 40-49.
  • A. Novoa, Talley, T.S., D. Talley, J. Crooks, N. Reyns. 2016. Spatial and Temporal Examination of Bivalve Communities in Several Estuaries of Southern California and Northern Baja California, MX. PLOS One DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0148220
  • Talley, D.M., T.S. Talley, A. Blanco. 2015. Insights into the establishment of the Manila clam on a tidal flat at the southern end of an introduced range in Southern California, USA. PLOS One DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0118891
  • Nordström, M.C., C.A. Currin, T.S. Talley, C.R. Whitcraft, L.A. Levin. 2014. Benthic food-web succession in a developing salt marsh. Marine Ecology Progress Series 500: 43-55.
  • Cook, R., T.S. Talley. 2013. The invertebrate communities associated with aChrysanthemum coronarium-invaded coastal sage scrub area in Southern California. Biological Invasions 16: 365-380.
  • Talley, T.S., K. Nguyen, A. Nguyen. 2012. Testing the effects of an introduced palm on a riparian invertebrate community in Southern California.PLOS One http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0042460
  • Cook, R., T.S. Talley, P. Dayton, M. Wang, K. Nguyen. 2012. The effect of invasive crown daisy (Chrysanthemum coronarium) on a coastal sage scrub arthropod community in Southern California. California Invasive Plant Council Symposium 2011 15: 63-65.
  • Currin, C.A., L.A. Levin, T.S. Talley, R. Michener and D. Talley. 2011. The role of cyanobacteria in created and natural southern California salt marsh food webs. Marine Ecology 32:346-363.
  • Jones, C.G, J. Gutiérrez, J. Byers, J.Crooks, J. Lambrinos, T.S. Talley. 2010. A framework for understanding physical ecosystem engineering by organisms. Oikos 119: 1862-1869.
  • Fremier, A.K., T.S. Talley. 2009. Scaling conservation efforts with river hydrology: lessons from blue elderberry distributions along four central California rivers. Wetlands 29: 150-162.
  • Talley, D.M., T.S. Talley. 2008. General Ecology: Salinity. In The Encyclopedia of Ecology. Elsevier.
  • Talley, T.S. 2007. Which heterogeneity framework? Consequences for conclusions about patchy population distributions. Ecology 88(6): 1476-1489.
  • Talley, T.S., J.A. Crooks. 2007. Habitat conversion associated with bioeroding marine isopods. Pp 185-202 In K. Cuddington, J. Byers, A. Hastings, W. Wilson (eds.) Ecosystem Engineers: Concepts, Theory, and Applications. Academic Press, San Diego, CA.
  • Hastings, A., J.E. Byers, J.A. Crooks, K. Cuddington, C.G. Jones, J.G. Lambrinos, T.S. Talley and W.G. Wilson. 2007. Ecosystem engineers in space and time. Ecological Letters 10: 153-164.
  • Talley, T.S., E. Fleishman, M. Holyoak, D. Murphy and A. Ballard. 2007. Rethinking a rare-species conservation strategy in an urbanizing landscape: The case of the valley elderberry longhorn beetle. Biological Conservation 135: 21-32.

Biography

Talley uses science to advance the field of ecology, address coastal environmental issues, train tomorrow's leaders, and raise public awareness of our local natural ecosystems. Her research in coastal ecosystems spans both coasts of North America, with experience from New England, California, and Baja California, Mexico.

Research

Talley's three broad research programs are:

(1) Healthy Ocean-Healthy City, the goal of which is to improve the health of ecosystems, urban communities and seafood producing livelihoods by raising public awareness of our responsible seafood producers and by facilitating a diversity of local, native seafood in fisheries and farms.

(2) Coastal Ecosystem Ecology and Conservation, the goal of which is to improve our understanding of coastal ecosystems (salt marshes, estuaries, coastal scrub, riparian) so that we can make well informed decisions to protect and utilize their multitude of functions. This includes testing the influences on coastal ecosystem function especially during ecosystem restoration, species invasions and climate change.

(3) Making Waves, the goal of which is to use scientific research to encourage environmental stewardship and community well-being by strengthening connections between our citizens and coastal ecosystems, by better understanding how to get people engaged and active, and by enhancing and restoring our local urban ecosystems.

Education and Outreach

Talley participates in outreach activities for the public, environmental practitioners and educators, and since 2005 has taught a diversity of ecology, biology and environmental science classes at UCSD (current), University of San Francisco and University of San Diego, giving her the ability to effectively teach and communicate across a range of audiences. Since 2005, Talley has also served as a science advisor and wetland scientist for the Ocean Discovery Institute.

Academic Training

Talley received a bachelor’s degree in Botany from Connecticut College, a master’s degree in Biology from San Diego State University and her doctorate in Ecology from University of California, Davis.

Relevant Publications

  • Talley, T.S., H. Warde, N. Venuti. 2016. Local seafood availability in San Diego, California seafood markets. Future of Food: Journal on Food, Agriculture and Society 4(2): 40-49.
  • A. Novoa, Talley, T.S., D. Talley, J. Crooks, N. Reyns. 2016. Spatial and Temporal Examination of Bivalve Communities in Several Estuaries of Southern California and Northern Baja California, MX. PLOS One DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0148220
  • Talley, D.M., T.S. Talley, A. Blanco. 2015. Insights into the establishment of the Manila clam on a tidal flat at the southern end of an introduced range in Southern California, USA. PLOS One DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0118891
  • Nordström, M.C., C.A. Currin, T.S. Talley, C.R. Whitcraft, L.A. Levin. 2014. Benthic food-web succession in a developing salt marsh. Marine Ecology Progress Series 500: 43-55.
  • Cook, R., T.S. Talley. 2013. The invertebrate communities associated with aChrysanthemum coronarium-invaded coastal sage scrub area in Southern California. Biological Invasions 16: 365-380.
  • Talley, T.S., K. Nguyen, A. Nguyen. 2012. Testing the effects of an introduced palm on a riparian invertebrate community in Southern California.PLOS One http://dx.plos.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0042460
  • Cook, R., T.S. Talley, P. Dayton, M. Wang, K. Nguyen. 2012. The effect of invasive crown daisy (Chrysanthemum coronarium) on a coastal sage scrub arthropod community in Southern California. California Invasive Plant Council Symposium 2011 15: 63-65.
  • Currin, C.A., L.A. Levin, T.S. Talley, R. Michener and D. Talley. 2011. The role of cyanobacteria in created and natural southern California salt marsh food webs. Marine Ecology 32:346-363.
  • Jones, C.G, J. Gutiérrez, J. Byers, J.Crooks, J. Lambrinos, T.S. Talley. 2010. A framework for understanding physical ecosystem engineering by organisms. Oikos 119: 1862-1869.
  • Fremier, A.K., T.S. Talley. 2009. Scaling conservation efforts with river hydrology: lessons from blue elderberry distributions along four central California rivers. Wetlands 29: 150-162.
  • Talley, D.M., T.S. Talley. 2008. General Ecology: Salinity. In The Encyclopedia of Ecology. Elsevier.
  • Talley, T.S. 2007. Which heterogeneity framework? Consequences for conclusions about patchy population distributions. Ecology 88(6): 1476-1489.
  • Talley, T.S., J.A. Crooks. 2007. Habitat conversion associated with bioeroding marine isopods. Pp 185-202 In K. Cuddington, J. Byers, A. Hastings, W. Wilson (eds.) Ecosystem Engineers: Concepts, Theory, and Applications. Academic Press, San Diego, CA.
  • Hastings, A., J.E. Byers, J.A. Crooks, K. Cuddington, C.G. Jones, J.G. Lambrinos, T.S. Talley and W.G. Wilson. 2007. Ecosystem engineers in space and time. Ecological Letters 10: 153-164.
  • Talley, T.S., E. Fleishman, M. Holyoak, D. Murphy and A. Ballard. 2007. Rethinking a rare-species conservation strategy in an urbanizing landscape: The case of the valley elderberry longhorn beetle. Biological Conservation 135: 21-32.
Video: 
Meet Theresa Talley, CASG Extension Specialist
Project Wipeout - Sea Creatures & Safety
Speak City Heights: Cleaning trash from the canyon with Ocean Discovery Institute
NPR: How do we choose which seafood to eat?