James E. Eckman

Director, California Sea Grant
University of California, San Diego, Scripps Institution of Oceanography
Staff / jeckman@ucsd.edu / (858) 534-4440

California Sea Grant Director Dr. James E. Eckman is a biological oceanographer and longtime science administrator from Arlington, Va.

Eckman most recently led the Marine Mammals and Biological Oceanography Program at the Office of Naval Research in Arlington, Va., where he worked for 13 years. The program supports research of the effects of sound on marine mammals and the use of optical and acoustical methods to study various marine biological processes.

Previously, Eckman was a faculty member at the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography in Savannah, and adjunct faculty at the University of Georgia in Athens and University of South Carolina in Columbia. His research focused mainly on benthic ecology -- the study of the organisms that live in and on the sea floor.

Eckman has a doctorate degree in biological oceanography from the University of Washington. He then spent two years at the State University of New York Stony Brook as a postdoctoral researcher. In New York, he studied the bay scallop with funding from New York Sea Grant.

California Sea Grant Director Dr. James E. Eckman is a biological oceanographer and longtime science administrator from Arlington, Va.

Eckman most recently led the Marine Mammals and Biological Oceanography Program at the Office of Naval Research in Arlington, Va., where he worked for 13 years. The program supports research of the effects of sound on marine mammals and the use of optical and acoustical methods to study various marine biological processes.

Previously, Eckman was a faculty member at the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography in Savannah, and adjunct faculty at the University of Georgia in Athens and University of South Carolina in Columbia. His research focused mainly on benthic ecology -- the study of the organisms that live in and on the sea floor.

Eckman has a doctorate degree in biological oceanography from the University of Washington. He then spent two years at the State University of New York Stony Brook as a postdoctoral researcher. In New York, he studied the bay scallop with funding from New York Sea Grant.